Shallot determined to bust out of its wrapper, MarchShallot determined to bust out of its wrapper, March
Two varieties of garlic, plus shallots and leeksTwo varieties of garlic, plus shallots and leeks
GarlicGarlic
ShallotsShallots
Leek, AprilLeek, April
ShallotsShallots
Garlic topsGarlic tops
Potatoes getting huge, JunePotatoes getting huge, June
And starting to fall over all the onions and shallotsAnd starting to fall over all the onions and shallots
Nice looking summer squash, escarole and corn, protected from vine borers by the row coverNice looking summer squash, escarole and corn, protected from vine borers by the row cover
If only they could stay looking this goodIf only they could stay looking this good
BUNNY!BUNNY!
Charlie had the big lens out just in time to see...Charlie had the big lens out just in time to see...
You cannot hide, BunnyYou cannot hide, Bunny
It even made a little bunny-sized hole in the soilIt even made a little bunny-sized hole in the soil
What you got there? Can I eat it?What you got there? Can I eat it?
Dirty hands after digging up the potatoes with my good friend Amanda and her boys, JulyDirty hands after digging up the potatoes with my good friend Amanda and her boys, July
No commentNo comment
In the middle of disassembling the bed and digging up the potatoes, AugustIn the middle of disassembling the bed and digging up the potatoes, August
Not much left to see hereNot much left to see here
Leeks getting bigLeeks getting big
Corn and summer squash, tumbling outside the bedCorn and summer squash, tumbling outside the bed
Yellow squash growing in the grassYellow squash growing in the grass
  • Shallot determined to bust out of its wrapper, March
  • Two varieties of garlic, plus shallots and leeks
  • Garlic
  • Shallots
  • Leek, April
  • Shallots
  • Garlic tops
  • Potatoes getting huge, June
  • And starting to fall over all the onions and shallots
  • Nice looking summer squash, escarole and corn, protected from vine borers by the row cover
  • If only they could stay looking this good
  • BUNNY!
  • Charlie had the big lens out just in time to see...
  • You cannot hide, Bunny
  • It even made a little bunny-sized hole in the soil
  • What you got there? Can I eat it?
  • Dirty hands after digging up the potatoes with my good friend Amanda and her boys, July
  • No comment
  • In the middle of disassembling the bed and digging up the potatoes, August
  • Not much left to see here
  • Leeks getting big
  • Corn and summer squash, tumbling outside the bed
  • Yellow squash growing in the grass

Raised Bed #4
This raised bed was primarily alliums for most of the year. It grew our Duganski and Inchelium Red varieties of garlic (as well as a Lautrec pink variety I brought back from France that never grew).

Next in line were the leeks, which I started from seed in January. They take forever to grow, but I think it’s worth it because you can pull them up in the middle of winter when almost everything else is gone. Plus leeks are excellent in warm winter dishes. They’ve been there all season, and they’ll continue to be there for a long time.

We also grew French and Dutch varieties of shallots for the first time, and brown and red varieties of onions. The shallots and onions were both negatively affected by the fingerling potatoes that I planted on the west side of the bed. I didn’t anticipate how tall the potatoes would grow, but they ended up shading out the shallots and onions as they grew, then finally just fell over on top of them. Needless to say, the shallots and onions didn’t appreciate it very much and showed their discontent by not bulking up their bulbs. The onions were almost a total loss. We did get quite a few shallots, but most of them were pretty small, making cleaning and peeling quite a chore. A lot of them were lost to mould during the drying phase, too. I think we’ll try growing shallots one more time, but if they turn out like this year again, I don’t think they’re worth it.

The potatoes did pretty well. We grew a French fingerling variety. I added another layer of blocks on the bed around them and added more soil to essentially hill them up as they grew. I ended up burying the soaker hose in the process, though, which meant that the upper layer of soil (and plant growth) didn’t get water. I think this was probably a poor choice on my part. I’d guess that we would have had a better harvest if I’d kept the hose on top. As it turned out, all the potatoes were in the lower layers of the blocks, and none in the upper layers where I’d added more soil. But the potatoes we got are nice quality, and delicious.

Interestingly, the mass of tangled potato vines became home to a bunny. And not just any bunny, but – Bunny. Bunny has grown up in our backyard since the spring, and appears almost every day. I started to get worried when I saw bunny hopping into the bed, but finally figured out that he (she?) wasn’t eating anything and was just using it as a comfy and cool place to take a nap. Fine by me.

After I pulled the garlic out I planted corn, yellow summer squash and zucchini. The yellow squash was the Zephyr variety, and the zucchini was Costata Romanesco. As predicted, the zucchini was not a strong producer, but the yellow squash was. We ate a good amount of squash, but we shredded and froze a TON. We’ll be eating a lot of squash this winter.

 

2 Responses to “Late summer garden update: Bed #4”

  1. pattyskypants
    13 September 2012 at 7:40 pm #

    Our bunny ate clover all summer, but disappeared mid-August. Squash borers always get my squash, so maybe it’s time for me to cover it. Do you leave it like that all summer? How about eggplant? Flea beetles totally trash mine.

  2. CoMo Homestead
    19 September 2012 at 8:50 am #

    We left the summer squash covered just until it started flowering. It needs pollinators to be able to make fruit. I’m pretty sure eggplant is the same way.