Pizza with caramelized onions and kale chipsPizza with caramelized onions and kale chips
Unleavened pizza crust with olive oil and freshly cracked pepperUnleavened pizza crust with olive oil and freshly cracked pepper
We added cheese first to keep it from overwhelming the toppingsWe added cheese first to keep it from overwhelming the toppings
Adding the caramelized onionsAdding the caramelized onions
This was a great pizza with a great crustThis was a great pizza with a great crust
  • Pizza with caramelized onions and kale chips
  • Unleavened pizza crust with olive oil and freshly cracked pepper
  • We added cheese first to keep it from overwhelming the toppings
  • Adding the caramelized onions
  • This was a great pizza with a great crust

A couple weeks ago we set out to make pizza. Our toppings: caramelized onions and homegrown kale chips. Partway into the process we discovered that we had no leavening agents. No yeast, no baking soda, no baking powder. (This was a holdover from early April, when we’d observed the Days of Unleavened Bread, and removed all leavening agents and leavened products from our homes. I hadn’t replaced them yet.)

What to do? With no leavening, how could we make pizza dough? I remembered that my mom had a recipe for unleavened pizza dough, and set to Googling it. I stumbled across this recipe for unleavened pizza crust (displayed on Page 2).

I want to share it here because this is by far one of the best tasting pizza crusts I’ve ever had. For me to even say “best tasting pizza crusts” is an accomplishment, because I’m normally not a fan of the crust and usually give my crusty ends to Charlie to eat. Not so with this crust.

Unleavened Pizza Crust

  • 1 c whole wheat flour (or white, or a mixture of both)
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 4 T oil
  • 1/3 c milk
  • Cornmeal for the pizza peel

There’s nothing challenging about this dough. You mix the dry ingredients, add the wet to the dry, knead it a few times, then roll it out. You can pre-bake it on a pizza stone to make sure it’s crisp before adding your ingredients.

The crust is thin, crisp, salty and buttery (and yet contains no butter). Yeasty doughs will always have their value, but this dough can fill in nicely when you’re in a time crunch, or if you just happen to not have any leavening.

6 Responses to “Unleavened pizza crust”

  1. Greg
    28 December 2012 at 10:38 pm #

    Baking guidelines for the crust would be nice. After making this dough, the parts that were fully cooked are really good.

  2. CoMo Homestead
    16 January 2013 at 6:20 pm #

    Hi Greg,
    I’m glad you liked the crust – although I’m sorry to hear you had difficulties with getting it to bake consistently.

    We bake our pizzas on a pizza stone, and we heat the oven to 450 (with the stone in) for a good amount of time before we put the pizza in. That way the stone starts wicking moisture away from the crust right away, and crisps it up. Usually ours bake fully within 10-15 minutes.

    We usually put the crust in with all the toppings, but if one of the toppings is particularly wet, it can help to pre-bake the crust first.

  3. Maria
    27 March 2013 at 5:08 am #

    Loved this making it again tonight! just popping by to say thanks!!

  4. Rudlea
    4 August 2013 at 11:56 am #

    I love, love, love, love, love, and love this recipe! At first I did not believe it would come out so buttery and done(according to Greg comments) BUT I trod on and made this crust rolling out to make my own version of hot pockets. The crust was excellent and i cannot say that enough! It is Buttery, flakey and on I can’t wait to make something else with this recipe. Thank you for taking the time in placing it for all to try. Shabbat Shalom!

  5. Krithika
    2 August 2014 at 10:04 am #

    Hi Greg,
    Can I substitute cornmeal with something else?

  6. CoMo Homestead
    5 August 2014 at 8:18 am #

    Sure. The cornmeal is just there to prevent the crust from sticking to the pizza stone or whatever else you bake it on. You can substitute flour or something similar.