Mother sweet potato in JuneMother sweet potato in June
Getting big in JulyGetting big in July
Nice vines growing after we'd already pulled off several rounds of growthNice vines growing after we'd already pulled off several rounds of growth
Finding the final gift from the mama sweet potato in NovemberFinding the final gift from the mama sweet potato in November
The sweet potato that wouldn't give up making more sweet potatoesThe sweet potato that wouldn't give up making more sweet potatoes
So long, sweet potatoSo long, sweet potato
  • Mother sweet potato in June
  • Getting big in July
  • Nice vines growing after we'd already pulled off several rounds of growth
  • Finding the final gift from the mama sweet potato in November
  • The sweet potato that wouldn't give up making more sweet potatoes
  • So long, sweet potato

We kept a single sweet potato from last season as our stock for sweet potato slips for this season. I got them planted in the garden way late, and it definitely affected our yield. We only got about 15 pounds, which I am happy about because it’s a decent amount of food, but we should have gotten much more for the amount of space we had planted.

This single mama sweet potato, though, just wouldn’t give up. After we pulled off the initial slips, I was going to toss her on the compost pile. Charlie developed a fondness for her, though, so he stuck her in an unused planter with soil. This sweet potato kept producing more and more slips that we would pluck off and plant in our sweet potato bed. I think only the earliest planting produced anything substantial, but that’s most likely due to the longer growing time they had.

The mother sweet potato kept growing vines all season. When it finally came time to pull up the sweet potatoes and clean up the garden, I pulled up mama sweet potato, too. Guess what? She’d produced ANOTHER sweet potato in the little planter where she was growing.

Thank you, mama sweet potato. You served us well.

3 Responses to “The sweet potato that kept on giving”

  1. Charlie Triplett
    23 December 2011 at 9:09 am #

    POTATO!

  2. gina
    21 February 2012 at 5:03 pm #

    Lov e your blog! I just found it. I work in Columbia (Live in Cooper County). I’ve been gardening for a few years but my garden hasn’t done well the last two years. Tell me how you do the slips. Do you just clip them off and replant them? Are you starting your own slips for planting this spring/summer with Mama Sweet Potato. I love sweet potatoes! Cool that you even got on in the pot.

    Thanks for posting!

  3. CoMo Homestead
    22 February 2012 at 5:48 pm #

    Thanks, Gina!

    Once the sweet potato has produced the slips, you just pull them off. You don’t have to cut them. I believe pulling them off keeps some fine root hairs at the bottom of the vine intact so they can get growing again. Then you just stick them in your soil, water and you’re finished.

    We are starting our own slips again this year, but from different potatoes. :) They take forever to get going, though. This year I’m trying the plant in soil method rather than the water method, but already it’s been a month with no sign of budding. Waiting, waiting, waiting.