8 pounds of celery in one arm, and a basket full of beets and the most perfect, gorgeous Swiss chard in the other8 pounds of celery in one arm, and a basket full of beets and the most perfect, gorgeous Swiss chard in the other
The makings of celery curryThe makings of celery curry
So that's where the red food colouring goes!So that's where the red food colouring goes!
On our way to celery soupOn our way to celery soup
If you've cooked with celeriac (celery root), this might look familiar. They're the same plant, but celeriac is bred for the root and celery for the stalk.If you've cooked with celeriac (celery root), this might look familiar. They're the same plant, but celeriac is bred for the root and celery for the stalk.
They do tend to take up a lot of space because they're not mashed together like the ones in the grocery store.They do tend to take up a lot of space because they're not mashed together like the ones in the grocery store.
That is a big honkin' plantThat is a big honkin' plant
This is the crunchiest, darkest celery you've ever seenThis is the crunchiest, darkest celery you've ever seen
  • 8 pounds of celery in one arm, and a basket full of beets and the most perfect, gorgeous Swiss chard in the other
  • The makings of celery curry
  • So that's where the red food colouring goes!
  • On our way to celery soup
  • If you've cooked with celeriac (celery root), this might look familiar. They're the same plant, but celeriac is bred for the root and celery for the stalk.
  • They do tend to take up a lot of space because they're not mashed together like the ones in the grocery store.
  • That is a big honkin' plant
  • This is the crunchiest, darkest celery you've ever seen

I don’t know anything about growing celery.

A couple years ago I asked a local grower about growing celery. She said it was kind of a finicky plant to grow, wasn’t easy to grow in our climate, and most growers didn’t bother with it. I had seeds on hand, though, so I decided to give it a shot.

I planted the seeds inside in February. They sat under lights for months, barely growing. When it was time to set them out they were still so small I hesitated to bother even planting them. Rather than directly doom them to death by tossing the seedlings onto the compost pile, though, I decided I might as well plant them and see what happened.

Other plants went into the garden around them. Plants came out. Other plants went in. All the while, the celery was there, still not doing much. I don’t even have photos of them growing because there was nothing to see. Spring passed. The summer heat passed. Finally September rolled around, and the things took off.

They were getting big right before we left for our Europe trip at the beginning of October. I left them in and thankfully we didn’t have a hard freeze while we were away. By the end of October, these four celery plants were huge.

I harvested one a few weeks ago, and it came in at over 4 pounds. At the beginning of this week I harvested another. Two nights ago we got a hard freeze, so I brought the other two plants in. All totalled, these four plants weighed over 16 pounds. 16 POUNDS OF CELERY! What am I going to do with 16 pounds of celery??

I did make a celery curry a few nights ago, which was amazing with plain yogurt in a pita. I reckon we’re going to have many more meals like this in the next couple weeks, because these three huge plants are taking up an inordinate amount of space in my fridge. Time to get working on that root cellar…

6 Responses to “Gargantuan celery”

  1. What Pigs Don't Know
    19 November 2011 at 9:49 am #

    Wow, Annette! Your garden is doing awesome this year! My hats off to you! Let me ask – do you use any fertilizer, and if so, what kind? Thanks! -Carrie

  2. Alisa
    19 November 2011 at 8:02 pm #

    Stunning!! Congratulations on growing amazing celery in Missouri. I got some local celery in my Bounty Box last week and it was 1/4 that size, if that.

  3. CoMo Homestead
    20 November 2011 at 9:34 pm #

    Thanks, ladies! I am pretty excited. This has been a very good year for us.

    Carrie – we use the Gardening Revolution system (http://www.gardeningrevolution.com/) that is a weed-free, intensive organic growing system. The guy who developed it has formulated a proprietary mineral fertilizer mix which you add in when you’re building the bed, and then you top dress throughout the season. The only place you can get the fertilizer is from him (bummer), but I do have a pretty good idea of what’s in it, if you’re interested in mixing it up yourself.

    I want to get to the point where we’re producing enough compost to be self-sufficient with our fertilizer needs, but until then this stuff is amazing and makes the plants go crazy.

  4. What Pigs Don't Know
    21 November 2011 at 10:41 am #

    I’ve never heard of the Gardening Revolution System but looked at the website and it seems pretty amazing. I have NEVER seen such high wire towers (filled with beans?). Wow! I would love to know your/his fertilizer mix components.
    And as to producing enough compost I know the key….Chickens! Seriously, you should get some. -Carrie

  5. CoMo Homestead
    21 November 2011 at 11:00 am #

    Ha! Chickens have already been ix-nayed by my husband. :)

    Send me an email and I’ll send you the fertilizer info.

  6. Lizzie
    3 February 2013 at 9:54 pm #

    Hi! That is amazing! What variety did you use?


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