Bite size tomatoes = lunch snacks for weeks!Bite size tomatoes = lunch snacks for weeks!
These yellow pear tomatoes were prolific. Their growth and spread over the other plants was unbelievable.These yellow pear tomatoes were prolific. Their growth and spread over the other plants was unbelievable.
Finally, some tomatoes that the squirrel didn't getFinally, some tomatoes that the squirrel didn't get
I had to literally be inside the jungle to pick these suckers.I had to literally be inside the jungle to pick these suckers.
There were a ton of tomatoes. Can we all agree on that?There were a ton of tomatoes. Can we all agree on that?
Fall-picked tomatoes from late October, plus a few hot peppersFall-picked tomatoes from late October, plus a few hot peppers
  • Bite size tomatoes = lunch snacks for weeks!
  • These yellow pear tomatoes were prolific. Their growth and spread over the other plants was unbelievable.
  • Finally, some tomatoes that the squirrel didn't get
  • I had to literally be inside the jungle to pick these suckers.
  • There were a ton of tomatoes. Can we all agree on that?
  • Fall-picked tomatoes from late October, plus a few hot peppers

In October Charlie and I spent 3 weeks in France and England. Our tomatoes were just starting to bear serious amounts right before we left, so while we were there I was concerned that frost would hit and the plants would be wiped out before we got home.

We did have a couple rounds of light frost before we got back, but the tomatoes survived. Hooray! That left us with having to deal with huge quantities of tomatoes when we returned.

On our first full day back, we started picking. We picked 15 pounds of very ripe, use-right-now tomatoes. Our neighbour also picked while we were away, and she said that she probably picked another 15 pounds. So our plants had 30 pounds of ripe fruit in October, not including all the green fruit that didn’t have time to ripen up. How ridiculous.

I let the plants stick around for a couple weeks, but eventually needed to chop them down so I could replant the plot with garlic. Before we chopped and removed the plants, we spent hours picking all the green fruit. Seriously. We picked 45 pounds of green tomatoes. 45 POUNDS!

I’m working my way through several strategies of what to do with all the green tomatoes. More on that later.

So for now, we have boxes and boxes of tomatoes in our basement. They are gradually ripening, so we’ve already made a couple rounds of fresh pasta sauce and used the tomatoes as toppings on pizza and sandwiches.

3 Responses to “Fall tomatoes”

  1. Amanda
    28 November 2011 at 4:32 pm #

    Have you gotten at all into canning? I have done some pretty off-the-wall planning, and I am pretty sure that we easily use 70 quarts of different kinds of canned tomatoes — salsa, pasta sauce, diced tomatoes (for chili, soups). If you were to can some before KC, I’d totally buy some off you!

  2. CoMo Homestead
    28 November 2011 at 5:39 pm #

    I did start canning this year. I canned some local tomatoes that I bought from a farm partway through the summer when I didn’t know whether or not our tomatoes would produce anything. I canned salsa, and later used our tomatoes to make a couple pints of pasta sauce.

    The bummer about these fall tomatoes was that by the time we got back to them, they’d already been frosted. It didn’t necessarily damage the quality of the fruit, but it makes them technically unsafe for canning because the acidity content isn’t as high. So as these are ripening up, I’m blending them up (for pasta sauce, chili or whatever) and freezing them.

    If you want some frozen blocks of tomatoes, that can be arranged. :)


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