8 feet high and climbing, as of August 208 feet high and climbing, as of August 20
Pear tomatoPear tomato
The slicing tomatoes have progressively gotten smaller as the season has gone onThe slicing tomatoes have progressively gotten smaller as the season has gone on
Big ol' slicerBig ol' slicer
We're in tomatoesWe're in tomatoes
Corn post-harvesting. We picked a solid dozen, and still have a few more growing.Corn post-harvesting. We picked a solid dozen, and still have a few more growing.
Yellow summer squashYellow summer squash
PeepersPeepers
Sauce tomatoesSauce tomatoes
Corns! This was the day before the wind blew them over.Corns! This was the day before the wind blew them over.
Nice silkingNice silking
Big, gangly butternut squash plantsBig, gangly butternut squash plants
Big Momma butternut squashBig Momma butternut squash
Love the stripingLove the striping
Baby butternut squashBaby butternut squash
Very baby butternut squashesVery baby butternut squashes
LeeksLeeks
Swiss chard. This now has mostly gotten overrun by the butternut squash.Swiss chard. This now has mostly gotten overrun by the butternut squash.
BasilBasil
KohlrabiKohlrabi
Yellow pear tomatoes, from old, poorly stored seeds. Viva la germination!Yellow pear tomatoes, from old, poorly stored seeds. Viva la germination!
  • 8 feet high and climbing, as of August 20
  • Pear tomato
  • The slicing tomatoes have progressively gotten smaller as the season has gone on
  • Big ol' slicer
  • We're in tomatoes
  • Corn post-harvesting. We picked a solid dozen, and still have a few more growing.
  • Yellow summer squash
  • Peepers
  • Sauce tomatoes
  • Corns! This was the day before the wind blew them over.
  • Nice silking
  • Big, gangly butternut squash plants
  • Big Momma butternut squash
  • Love the striping
  • Baby butternut squash
  • Very baby butternut squashes
  • Leeks
  • Swiss chard. This now has mostly gotten overrun by the butternut squash.
  • Basil
  • Kohlrabi
  • Yellow pear tomatoes, from old, poorly stored seeds. Viva la germination!

The garden is exploding. We picked 25 pounds of vegetables in eight days. Carrots, kohlrabi, tomatoes, peppers, corn.

On the other hand, my life is exploding, and I haven’t had time to do anything with any of the food we’ve harvested.

On the other hand, we haven’t purchased any substantial amount of vegetables since May.

We have 5 quart containers filled with sauce tomatoes at peak ripeness. Our crisper drawers in the fridge are packed with the veg I’ve harvested in the past week.

The tomato plants are officially to the top of the 8-foot cattle panel trellises, and going strong. For the most part, I’ve given up on training them up the panels because a) they’re well secured now and b) I can’t reach the tops of the plants.

Last Sunday I planted beets, Brussels sprouts, kale, Swiss chard and turnips for the fall garden. I have been much more on the ball and on time with the garden this year, and I’m really hoping we can keep it going through the fall and winter. I still need to get the carrots planted after the corn comes out, and start the winter greens in soil blocks to plug in once the summer crops are finished.

The corn, despite being blown over again, was pollinated well and we had very little loss due to insect damage. And there was nary a corn ear worm to be seen. I did lose one ear to critter gnawing damage since the ears were low to the ground from the plants’ being blown over, but overall, no big deal.

The zucchini succumbed to squash vine borer damage before it ever produced a fruit, but the yellow squash apparently cannot be killed. It has multiple points of borer damage, cucumber beetles and squash bugs and is starting to look ratty, but it’s still blooming and bearing fruit. Rock on, my squash friend. Next year I want to look into the varieties of squash with solid stems rather than hollow, that are supposedly resistant to borers. Stupid vine borers.

The butternut squash are going crazy and are taking over at least half of one bed. I don’t know if I’ll be able to keep them contained. We should have an excellent harvest.

The sweet potatoes are also doing really well and have almost completely covered the area where they’re planted. I got them in late, but it’s looking good to have another big harvest this year. They kept us in good eating for many winter months last year.

My exploding life recently has made me even more appreciative of our very low maintenance, weed-free garden system, and our automatic watering system. Besides planting things last Sunday, I’ve paid basically no attention to anything in the garden for weeks.

Plant and pick. It’s the only way to grow.

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