Brussels sprouts greens, easily substituted in cooked greens recipesBrussels sprouts greens, easily substituted in cooked greens recipes
The ferny parts are asparagus, and everything else is Brussels sprouts. I chopped them down at this point to give the asparagus more light.The ferny parts are asparagus, and everything else is Brussels sprouts. I chopped them down at this point to give the asparagus more light.
Huge, huge plants after flowering, setting out seed pods and getting pushed over slightly by the windHuge, huge plants after flowering, setting out seed pods and getting pushed over slightly by the wind
Brussels sprout flower about to openBrussels sprout flower about to open
Exactly the same plants, but very different growth habitsExactly the same plants, but very different growth habits
This smaller plant had a completely different form compared to the larger oneThis smaller plant had a completely different form compared to the larger one
Starting to grow sprouts (but never fully forming), April 11Starting to grow sprouts (but never fully forming), April 11
Getting large, April 11Getting large, April 11
After wintering over, March 11After wintering over, March 11
Brussels sprouts, November 10Brussels sprouts, November 10
Nice Brussels sprouts greens, fully edibleNice Brussels sprouts greens, fully edible
  • Brussels sprouts greens, easily substituted in cooked greens recipes
  • The ferny parts are asparagus, and everything else is Brussels sprouts. I chopped them down at this point to give the asparagus more light.
  • Huge, huge plants after flowering, setting out seed pods and getting pushed over slightly by the wind
  • Brussels sprout flower about to open
  • Exactly the same plants, but very different growth habits
  • This smaller plant had a completely different form compared to the larger one
  • Starting to grow sprouts (but never fully forming), April 11
  • Getting large, April 11
  • After wintering over, March 11
  • Brussels sprouts, November 10
  • Nice Brussels sprouts greens, fully edible

Since we’re on the subject of neglect, let’s talk about our Brussels sprouts plants.

Similar to the carrots, I planted the Brussels sprouts in the fall, but they didn’t really have time to get going and produce anything before it got too cold.

I left them where they were and provided no protection from the winter cold or snow. In the spring, surprisingly, they started growing again.

They never got to the point of growing actual sprouts, but they did grow some pretty nice leaves which we cooked up and ate as greens. Eventually they got huge and sent up seed pods as well. Like most brassicas, they attracted cabbage worms. It was a pretty spectacular sight to see a brilliant red cardinal perched in this Brussels sprout tree, picking off the cabbage worms.

3 Responses to “Neglected Brussels sprouts”

  1. Shelley
    6 July 2011 at 8:57 am #

    I had brussel sprouts which I planted last spring. We enjoyed delicious sprouts clear through February when we dug through the snow to harvest them. This spring, I pulled out most of the “dead” brussel sprouts, but some were too entrenched, so I just left them. They came back to life and produced flowers and green leaves, but no new sprouts. Thanks for the idea of eating the greens. That hadn’t occurred to me.

  2. CoMo Homestead
    6 July 2011 at 9:27 am #

    Yes! I try really hard to not let anything go to waste. We had a pretty decent harvest of leaves and they provided for several meals.

  3. Linata
    19 June 2014 at 8:35 am #

    Can you eat the seed pods as well? They look like little string beans to me.


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