Our strawberry patch after I pulled the middle strip up, laid down boards to keep the plants from growing back into the middle, and put down a soaker hose. The bricks were temporary and helped with keeping the hose where I wanted it when I was placing it.Our strawberry patch after I pulled the middle strip up, laid down boards to keep the plants from growing back into the middle, and put down a soaker hose. The bricks were temporary and helped with keeping the hose where I wanted it when I was placing it.
Strawberry blossom budStrawberry blossom bud
Stem of a strawberry plant. Nice hairs!Stem of a strawberry plant. Nice hairs!
Strawberry leafStrawberry leaf
It's pretty magical that these things will turn into strawberriesIt's pretty magical that these things will turn into strawberries
Strawberry blossom!Strawberry blossom!
  • Our strawberry patch after I pulled the middle strip up, laid down boards to keep the plants from growing back into the middle, and put down a soaker hose. The bricks were temporary and helped with keeping the hose where I wanted it when I was placing it.
  • Strawberry blossom bud
  • Stem of a strawberry plant. Nice hairs!
  • Strawberry leaf
  • It's pretty magical that these things will turn into strawberries
  • Strawberry blossom!

It’s almost strawberry time, my friends.

Strawberry time is a good time indeed.

Last year we yielded 18 pounds of strawberries in just a few weeks. It was pretty amazing to come home from work and pick anywhere between a handful of strawberries to a stellar four pounds. It became a daily ritual.

What happened to all those strawberries, you might ask?

We ate them.

I think I managed to freeze a couple bagfuls and made freezer jam out of them later. But for the most part, we just ate them and enjoyed every minute.

I think we can have even higher yields this year. We had a substantial amount of fruit rot last year, partially due to the really wet conditions and partially due to crowding, so I thinned out a strip down the middle of our patch, hoping that it will lead to better air and light circulation. I replanted the plants that I pulled up in the holes in the blocks, and they are growing and flowering just fine.

It’s almost time!

3 Responses to “The strawberries are coming!”

  1. Christian
    20 April 2011 at 11:26 am #

    I just put two 3×3 beds of strawberries in (10 baby plants each) and I keep looking at them every day just on the off chance that they’ll blossom at this point in the season. Nothing yet, but I’m excited.

    (Not that I’m supposed to let them flower/bear this first year, but I know full well I’m going to cheat by just thinning the blossoms instead of pinching them all.)

    I mean, the pear tree already looks like it’s going to bury me in fruit so it’s not like I’ll be fruitless, but…

  2. CoMo Homestead
    20 April 2011 at 12:09 pm #

    Very cool! Our plants didn’t flower a whole lot the first year, but I did pinch the blossoms and it was very sad. :( But the second year we had a good yield and we’re looking forward to an even better yield this year!


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  1. […] fruit rot. So far the fruit rot has been much much less than last year, so I’m hoping the path I carved out of the middle of the bed is helping by providing more air circulation and […]

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